Morning Trip (233)

“I have a strong suspicion, but I can’t be sure, that much that passes for constant love is a golded-up moment walking in its sleep. Some people know that it is the walk of the dead, but in desperation and desolation, they have staked everything on life after death and the resurrection, so they haunt the graveyard. They build an altar to the tomb and wait there like faithful Mary for the stone to roll away. So the moment has authority over all of their lives. They pray constantly for the miracle of the moment to burst its bond and spread out over time.”
–Zora Neale Hurston

Morning Trip (232)

“A prophesy that comes true, especially a negative prophecy, is a prophecy that has failed. One doesn’t prophesy for the purpose of being accurate. A prophecy is an attempt to warn or to prepare people to make a change, and if they make that change, then what they’re preparing for just may not occur.”
–Paul Solomon

Morning Trip (231)

“Transcendence or detachment, leaving the body, pure love, lack of jealousy–that’s the vision we are given in our culture, generally, when we thing of the highest thing…Another way to look at it is that the aim of the person is not to be detached, but to be more attached–to be attached to working; to be attached to making chairs or something that helps everyone; to be attached to beauty, to be attached to music.”
–Robert Bly

Morning Trip (231)

“Question: If your house were on fire, which object would you take with you?
Tristan Bernard: The thing nearest the door.
Jean Cocteau: The fire.”

Ballast Quarterly Review

Morning Trip (228)

“Like all good hustlers, our egos employ crews of ruffians in case we don’t comply with their demands. Anger, blame, and avoidance are the ego’s bouncers. When we get too close to recognizing an experience as an emotional one, these three spring into action. It’s much easier to say, ‘I don’t give a damn,’ than it is to say, ‘I’m hurt.’ The ego likes blaming, finding fault, making excuses, inflicting payback, and lashing out, all of which are ultimate forms of self protection. The ego is also a fan of avoidance–assuring the offender that we’re fine, pretending that it doesn’t matter, that we’re impervious. We adopt a pose of indifference or stoicism, or we deflect with humor or cynicism. Whatever. Who cares?

When the bouncers are successful–when anger, blame, and avoidance push away real hurt, disappointment, or pain–our egos are free to scam all they want. Often the first hustle is putting down and shaming others for their lack of ’emotional control.’ Like all hustlers, the ego is a slick, conniving, and dangerous liar.”
–Brene Brown