Morning Trip (257)

“Good vs Evil is a prominent theme in Western culture. Our myths and popular entertainment are filled with it. Again and again we see two sides struggle for supremacy in some sort of final battle where the good emerges triumphant.

The trouble with applying this concept to life is that we naturally assume we must be the good guys and we must vanquish the other side, which must be evil.

In the meantime, the other side is thinking the exact same thing. Thus, both sides gear up for the final, climactic battle. There is no middle ground nor possibility of compromise.

It is time to try something different. Let go of the obsession with conflicts and replace it with a theme that promotes peace and collaboration.

Look at life not as a series of good vs evil battles, but simply as a journey of discovery. Look at other people not as your evil opponents, but simply as travel companions.

There is no titanic struggle for supremacy where one side emerges triumphant; there is only mutual assistance among friends…where everyone wins.

Examine the conflicts you experience or witness in your life. Are they truly necessary? To what extent are they caused by the pervasive tendency to see everything in terms of conflict? Notice the ones who are most lacking in harmony are also the ones who insist upon their moral certitude and goodness. Can you transcend this limiting mode of thought?

The sacred laws of hospitality bid us welcome the guest as a member of our own family: may all beings of good will who will come within the compass of my daily round today experience welcome and the hospitality of my heart.”
–Derek Lin

Daily Reading: Remembering Our Choice

“It’s easy to blame, the media, our culture, or our community for perpetuating unrealistic images of what it expects of us. But at the very core of these expectations, there is no one to blame; because a commercial, like self-judgement, has no power over us unless we agree with its message. It is only when we willingly attach ourselves to these images and distortions that our happiness is compromised.

We do not need to take the blame for these self-judgements. We can simply become aware that they have been developing in our lives since childhood through the process of domestication.

Once we are aware of our self-judgements, we can regain our freedom by choosing for ourselves to transcend the reward and punishment model that has been imposed upon us and eventually arrive at a place of self-acceptance. We have a choice. That is our power.

Practice: How many of your ideas and beliefs about the world and yourself are results of domestication and outside influence? Do you assume things should be or look a certain way because that’s what you’ve seen on TV or in your community, and it seems normal? With awareness question those assumptions today. Ask yourself if things might be otherwise and if you could be happy without these rigid ideals of perfection.”

Taken from: Living a Life of AWARENESS Daily Meditations on the TOLTEC Path by Don Miguel Ruiz Jr. ISBN: 9781938289231

Morning Trip (256)

“Trees
glitter like castles
of ribbons, the broad fields
smolder with light, a passing
creekbed lies
heaped with shining hills;
and though the questions
that have assailed us all day
remain – not a single
answer has been found –
walking out now
into the silence and the light
under the trees,
and through the fields,
feels like one.”

–Mary Oliver, First Snow

Speaking Out for Justice

Yes! Trump and his group are Trolling, rather than answering questions and performing as elected officials are to behave. Thanks for this!

Rosemary's Blog

img_1204

Today is our Dr. Martin Luther King holiday and a time to honor all those who had the courage to stand up against injustices and fight for human rights.  How dismaying that today — this very moment — freedom and justice are under threat again.  Trump attacks anyone who disagrees with him and surrounds himself with others who reflect only his uninformed views.

It reminds me of when President Bush called “unpatriotic” anyone who did not support his Iraq war.  Paul Krugman’s article defending John Lewis’s refusal to attend the inauguration because he does not view Trump as the “legitimate” president of a fair and free election is worth reading.  He reminds us that speaking our truths, speaking out against injustice is patriotic.

We can refuse to be silenced.  We must speak our truths.  As Madeleine L’Engle says in the poster above, “Let us have the courage to go…

View original post 4 more words