Morning Trip (200)

“But there is one vocation–philosophy–which knows that all men, by what they think about and wish for, in effect wield all tools. It knows that men thus determine, by their manner of thinking and wishing, whether it is worthwhile to wield any.”
–Aldo Leopold, A Sand County Almanac, November

Morning Trip (70) A Light…was there dark?

“There is a vitality, a life force,
a quickening that is translated through you into action,
and because there is only one of you in all time, this expression is unique.
If you block it, it will never exist through any other medium and be lost.
The world will not have it.

It is not your business to determine how good it is;
nor how valuable it is; nor how it compares with other expressions.
It is your business to keep it yours clearly and directly, to keep the channel open.

You do not even have to believe in yourself or your work.
You merely have to keep open and aware directly to the urges that motivate you.
Keep the channel open.

No artist is pleased . . .
There is no satisfaction whatever at any time.
There is only a queer, divine dissatisfaction;
a blessed unrest that keeps us marching and makes us more alive than the others.”
– Martha Graham

One Shoot Sunday and The Play–Purple Profundity: Poetry by Elisabeth Connelley

Sunday Photography Interview: Rosie Hardy & Poetry Challenge

“The time has come, one and all, for that saddest of days— it is my regret to once more say to you all that this is the final One Shoot Sunday. We have such a treat for you on the auspicious day, though, for it’s my pleasure to give to you the marvelous Rosie Hardy. Hardy has an amazing talent for people—from weddings, to children, to model events; but many of you music fans might recognize her work as well. Then 19-year-old Hardy provided the cover shot for Maroon 5′s album, Hands All Over (she also happened to be the model featured in the shot). She’s also done work for Samsung and Penguin Book Publishers, among many others. This young star of the photographic world was kind enough to take the time to interview with One Stop Poetry, and it’s my pleasure to offer her work and her words for our last feature here.

~Chris Galford”

 

Final Picture Prompt Challenge!

Photography by Rosie Hardy used from One Shoot Picture Prompt Poetry Challenge

 

The Play

Why are you there?

Living in my mind’s eye?

Your touch is Heaven and Hell at the same moment

Your voice is the whisper of Death.

I am a puppet wanting a heart.

You are the puppeteer.

You make me dance.

I believe I am free.

Then the play is over and you put me in my box.

Cold and empty and dead.

–by Elisabeth Connelley

The Optimist in Revolt and Chesterton…

“The person who is really in revolt is the optimist, who generally lives and dies in a desperate and suicidal effort to persuade other people how good they are.”
– G.K. Chesterton
my small boat

This was said is such a succinct manner! How did the act of being positive transform into such a giant play and drama. How did the act of noticing and being grateful become a way to target the insecure and to charge them all money while handing them a way to build their houses of bricks, made of straw, to cover the pit? A pit that only requires some simple tools to be able to be looked at and to be corrected?

I like reading Chesterton, though I cannot say I follow his religious convictions. He does have a lot to say about faith, and the creation of all sorts of false idols to prop up one’s floundering insides. I find him full of humor and intelligent wit.

Morning Trip (36)

“It’s similar to the process one undergoes when learning to play a musical instrument. We sit down, take a few lessons, and are given certain exercises. We begin to practice, and at first the fingers don’t move very easily; they hit a lot of wrong notes and it sounds terrible. But every day we practice, and gradually the fingers start to move more easily, the music starts to sound more beautiful. After a certain period of time, a proficiency develops so that the playing becomes effortless. At that time there is no difference between playing and practice; the playing itself is the practice.
In just the same way, as we practice awareness, we start out very slowly, aware of the movement of each step, “lifting,” “moving,” “placing,” aware of the breath, “rising, falling,” or “in, out.” In the beginning great effort is required. There are many gaps in the mindfulness. There are a lot of struggles and hindrances. But as the mind becomes trained in being aware, in being mindful, it becomes increasingly natural. There is a certain point in the practice when the momentum of mindfulness is so strong that it starts working by itself, and we begin to do things with an ease and simplicity and naturalness which is born out of this effortless awareness.”
– Joseph Goldstein
The Experience of Insight