Morning Trip (237)

“It would be an endless battle if it were all up to ego
because it does not destroy and is not destroyed by itself
It is like a wave
it makes itself up, it rushes forward getting nowhere really
it crashes, withdraws and makes itself up again
pulls itself together with pride
towers with pride
rushes forward into imaginary conquest
crashes in frustration
withdraws with remorse and repentance
pulls itself together with new resolution.”

–Agnes Martin
commonplace
crashingly beautiful
parabola

Morning Trip (64)

“Emotions drive the threesome of attention, meaning, and memory.” In essence, that just about sums up what we know about learning: attending to information, constructing meaning, and lodging it in our memory. Brain researchers have shown that emotions are critical to patterning, which is the way that information is organized in the brain, how we are able to retrieve that information. Emotions assist in both evaluating and integrating information and experiences.
However, as we know, not all emotions facilitate learning. Stress, frustration, anger, fear – all can overwhelm the brain with hormones and thought patterns that totally shut down one’s ability to learn. When major emotional flooding occurs it is true that one literally cannot think straight.”
– Eric Jensen
Teaching with the Brain in Mind

“I can remember the frustration of not being able to talk. I knew what I wanted to say, but I could not get the words out, so I would just scream.”
– Temple Grandin

“Generalised [sic] anger and frustration is something that gets you in the studio, and gets you to work – though it’s not necessarily evident in anything that’s finished”.
– Bruce Nauman

“Rips out hairs!”
– Elisa

The Optimist in Revolt and Chesterton…

“The person who is really in revolt is the optimist, who generally lives and dies in a desperate and suicidal effort to persuade other people how good they are.”
– G.K. Chesterton
my small boat

This was said is such a succinct manner! How did the act of being positive transform into such a giant play and drama. How did the act of noticing and being grateful become a way to target the insecure and to charge them all money while handing them a way to build their houses of bricks, made of straw, to cover the pit? A pit that only requires some simple tools to be able to be looked at and to be corrected?

I like reading Chesterton, though I cannot say I follow his religious convictions. He does have a lot to say about faith, and the creation of all sorts of false idols to prop up one’s floundering insides. I find him full of humor and intelligent wit.