How to Bloom

How amazing that I bumped into this when perusing your perpetual journal today! I was talking about a spiritual experience and conscious contact in the Morning Trip today! The poem How to Bloom describes it well and the flowers a wonderful BAM awake and perfect moment, evidence of noticing and being in the experience.

Rosemary's Blog

I was driving what I hoped would be a shortcut through residential streets to Fremont Avenue (it wasn’t), when I saw these flowers blooming in a parking strip.  I couldn’t recall seeing flowers like this before, so I pulled over to take some photographs.  No sooner had I stepped out of the car, when I was greeted by name!  I was parked in front of the house of one of our Greenwood Library patrons and knitting aficionados.  She told me the flowers were fritillaries.

How to Bloom
by Rainer Maria Rilke

I endlessly marvel at you, blissful ones — at your demeanor,
the way you bear your vanishing adornment with timeless purpose.
Ah, to understand how to bloom: then would the heart be carried
beyond all milder dangers, to be consoled in the great one.

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Morning Trip (358)

“. . . Every religion in the world has had a subset of devotees who seek a direct, transcendent experience with God, excusing themselves from fundamentalist scriptural or dogmatic study in order to personally encounter the divine. The interesting thing about these mystics is that, when they describe their experiences, they all end up describing exactly the same occurrence. Generally their union with God occurs in a meditative state, and is delivered thought an energy source that fills the entire body with euphoric, electric light . . .

The most difficult challenge, the saint wrote in her memoirs, was to not stir up the intellect during meditation, for any thoughts of the mind—-even the most fervent prayers—-will extinguish the fire of God. Once the troublesome mind ‘begins to compose speeches and dream up arguments, especially if they are clever, it will soon imagine it is doing important work.’ But if you can surpass those thoughts, Teresa explained, and ascend toward God, ‘it is a glorious bewilderment, a heavenly madness, in which true wisdom is acquired.’ Unknowingly echoing the poems of the Persian Sufi mystic Hafiz . . . .”

—Elizabeth Gilbert, Eat Pray Love

A New Way to Display Hellebores

Gosh, these are SO beautiful! I had never heard of these flowers before I ‘met’ Rosemary in the blogging world! Surprise this morning when reading her past posts for March 26.

Rosemary's Blog

I first saw the idea for displaying cut hellebores by floating their flower heads in a shallow bowl on Val Easton’s Plant Talk blog where she reported on the Portland Flower and Garden show.  Then I saw this very idea on display at the Elisabeth C. Miller Library at the Center for Urban Horticulture.  This is such a beautiful way to display cut flowers that I wanted to share it with you.

Thank goodness for hellebores.  They add a grace note to late winter and early spring.

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Morning Trip (357)

“. . . I have many friends in New York who are not religious people. Most, I would say. Either they fell away from the spiritual teachings of their youth or they never grew up with any God to begin with . . . What I’m seeing in some of my friends, though, as they are aging, is a longing to have something to believe in. But this longing chafes against any number of obstacles, including their intellect and common sense. Despite all their intellect, though, these people live in a world that careens about in a series of wild and devastating and completely nonsensical lurches. Great and horrible experiences of either suffering or joy occur in the lives of all these people, just as with the rest of us, and these mega-experiences tend to make us long for a spiritual context in which to express either lament or gratitude, or to seek understanding. The problem is—what to worship, whom to pray to? . . . . “
—-Elizabeth Gilbert, Eat Pray Love

Morning Trip (352)

“….If you view life through the eyes of the judge and conditional love, then life is no longer a work of art; rather, it becomes a series of goals to achieve and contests to win. You are happy when things go ‘right’ and upset when they go ‘wrong.’ Viewing life this way can make for a very difficult experience.

With awareness, notice how you view the ups and downs of life today. Are you trying to ‘win,’ or are you living in the realization that everything that occurs is an artistic creation of life? Be the artist, not the judge.”
—-Don Miguel Ruiz, Jr., Living a Life of Awareness, Daily Meditations on the Toltec Path